Published On: Wed, Nov 8th, 2017

What to eat when you’re constipated

Share This
Tags

ccccccccccccccccccYES, constipation is a little awkward to talk about, but it’s way worse to suffer in silence. And you’re far from alone if you commonly experience the telltale signs: bloating, pain when you try to poop, and trouble relieving yourself regularly. In fact, 42 million Americans deal with constipation every year.
Pinpointing what’s causing you to be plugged up can be tricky. Traveling a lot, changing your work schedule, and skipping workouts all can cause a change in your bathroom habits, says Jordan Karlitz, M.D., a gastroenterologist and assistant clinical professor at Tulane University School of Medicine.
But the biggest constipation culprit is what you eat—and that’s where the “F” word comes in. “The key is having enough fiber in your diet,” Karlitz says. “You want a good balance of soluble and insoluble fiber as well as enough water intake.”
Insoluble fiber bulks up stool, which makes it easier to pass through your system, while soluble fiber attracts water, which helps your body process the fiber without discomfort, says Gina Hassick, R.D. Just be sure to add fiber to your diet slowly to let your body adjust without gas and stomach pain, Hassick says. The next time you need help keeping things moving, turn to the 11 foods that help you poop below.
The oat grains in oatmeal contain soluble fiber that help with digestive issues and support heart health—talk about a win-win! And it’s hard to be bored with oatmeal when you have all of these ideas to take it from ordinary to outstanding.
H20 can’t stop, won’t stop with the health benefits. It not only keeps you hydrated, it also helps make bowel movements more regular. Yet another reason to hit the water cooler, stat.
Start your day right with a bowl of high-fiber cereal. Just make sure the brand you pick contains 5 or more grams of fiber per serving, like All Bran and Fiber 1, Karlitz says.
Ditching white bread for the whole-wheat variety gives you an added dose of antioxidants and important nutrients—one of which is insoluble fiber. The average slice of whole-wheat bread has nearly 2 grams of fiber, more than double what you get in white bread. Whole-wheat bread: 1. White bread: 0.
Just another reason to get your fill of nature’s candy. Strawberries are high in fiber, thanks to their edible seeds. Ripe bananas also have a substantial amount of soluble fiber, which Hassick says can help push waste through the bowels (you really needed that visual, didn’t you?).
With heart-healthy fats and generally good-for-you attributes, nuts are no doubt small but mighty—and almonds also come with a dose of soluble fiber.

Leave a comment

XHTML: You can use these html tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Untitled Album